How to Make a Ruffle Cake

Delicate waves and intricate ruffles simply made from buttercream icing!

How to Make a Ruffle Cake

Hi All!  Thank you so much for all of the kind words regarding last week’s cake.  I hope the gluten-free part didn’t scare too many of you away, but also inspired those that are gluten intolerant to bake beautiful things.  Also, I am super relieved that you all seemed to like the new blue backdrop.  It’s not something I plan to use everyday, but glad to have something fun and a little out of my comfort zone to spice things up every now and then.  But what you really seemed to be excited about is the delicate wave/ruffle piping.  As promised, I will be sharing how to do it yourself!

How to Make a Ruffle Cake

I love experimenting with buttercream every change I get.  When I first started my career working with cake back in 2007, it was all about fondant and novelty cakes.  I found the most joy either spending hours on delicate sugar flowers or making a cake that looked like other food – a hamburger cake or a donut, perhaps.  Trends come and go, and I am so glad to see that buttercream has made a definite comeback and seems to be here to stay. 

I personally made the transition from fondant back to buttercream after I closed my bakery and moved to Vancouver.  I was no longer making wedding cakes and didn’t have room in our city apartment to keep all the tools and supplies needed for those types of cakes.  Plus, I had nobody to eat or order them.  I started gravitating towards interesting flavour pairings and buttercream textures because those were the types of layer cakes that I wanted to eat myself and ones that you home bakers would appreciate the most.

I feel pretty nerdy and so pretentious saying that cake decorating is an art form and buttercream is my medium of choice, but it’s true!  As a child and into my twenties, I used dance as my creative outlet.  Now I use sugar and butter.  Using just an offset spatula and various piping tips, it’s fun and challenging to come up with new textures.  This delicate wave/ruffle pattern just happens to be one of my new favourite designs.

About 5 years ago I made a very similar design, except it was made purely from fondant.  Each wave was ruffled by hand and then gilded with a bit of edible gold paint on the delicate edges.   It took forever.  By the time all the ruffles were added, the fondant had dried and hardened.  It was gorgeous, but you’d have to pick off all of that hard work just to get to the yummy cake inside – essential making it a time-consuming decoration and not necessarily an edible garnish.

Today’s version is so much tastier and takes only about 10 to 15 minutes.  No, seriously!  Once your cake is crumb coated and your buttercream already whipped, the piping is quite simple and fast.  Plus, the organic-ness of it all means that your waves don’t have to be perfect.  In fact, embrace the imperfection!

How to Make a Ruffle Cake
How to Make a Ruffle Cake

How to Make a Ruffle Cake

1.     Place the cake on a cake board of the same size.  Fill, stack, and crumb coat your cake in buttercream icing.  You do not have to fully ice the cake, but the crumb coat should be thick enough that the cake layers do not show through.  Finish off the top of the cake as normal.

2.     Fit a piping bag with a petal tip (I used #103 on this 6-inch round cake) and fill with buttercream.

3.     (optional) Place the cake board (and cake) on top of an upside-down bowl so that it elevates the bottom of the cake.

4.     Hold the piping bag parallel to the side of the cake, keeping the wide end of the piping tip towards the cake – slightly touching the crumb coat.

5.     Keeping consistent pressure, start piping ruffles from the bottom of the cake to the top.  Create long, curvy waves as well as short ruffles for more interest.  Stop pressure before pulling the piping bag away at the top.  Repeat.

6.     Continue around the cake – sometimes following the curves of the previous wave and sometimes mixing it up.  I prefer the ruffles to be fairly close together for a delicate look.

7.     I find that the waves look more natural if the begin slightly bellow the cake – hence why I elevate it.  Once you pipe waves all the way around the cake, take an offset spatula or paring knife to gently “cut off” the bottom excess without disturbing the rest of the wave.

8.     Use an offset spatula to carefully lift the cake and place on a serving dish or cake stand.  Enjoy!

How to Make a Two-Toned Ruffle Cake

A step-by-step tutorial for creating a delicate, two-toned ruffled buttercream finish. Create these perfect petal details for a romantic, whimsical cake for spring!.

How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.

In honor of my new cookbook being available for pre-order, I wanted to create and share a brand-new cake decorating tutorial.  If you love this, then I think you will really enjoy my book!  For those of you who don't already know, the book is called "Layered: Baking, Building, and Styling Spectacular Layer Cakes."  The subtitle is a bit long, but it really illustrates all that the book entails.  It is 288-pages packed full of color photos, decorating tips, industry tricks, and about 150 delicious recipes.  

How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.

There are several buttercream textures and piping ideas throughout the book (including a similar ruffle cake), but nothing quite like this two-toned version.  Once I got the idea to create this cake and started to see my vision come to life, I fell instantly in love.  And really, the only reason it did not make it in the book is simply because I did not think of the concept until after the manuscript was submitted.  Instead, treat this post as a preview to the fun and flirty cake designs and tutorials that you can find if you buy the book.  Pretty great, right?  Are you going to run and pre-order your copy now? I hope so =)

How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.

For spring, I wanted to create a ruffle cake that resembled flower petals.  Instead of the popular zig-zag ruffle cake, I flipped the piping tip 90-degrees and went with a horizontal ruffle.  Using a petal tip, I was able to make delicate rows of ruffles, each one resembling a flower petal.  Instead of tinting the buttercream a solid color, I decided to stripe my piping bag – painting a bit of pink and coral buttercream just on the side where the narrow end of the petal tip would be.  This way, each piped petal would be two-toned!  Of course, I could have stopped there, but why not throw a color gradient into the mix?  As I progressed with my piping, I added a bit more orange to my pink each time I filled the piping bag to create a beautiful coral ombre effect.  I know the color gradient didn't turn out absolutely perfect (neither are all the ruffles for that matter), but isn't it still so pretty?  I just love all the texture and imperfect bits of color.  Can you tell I am fairly pleased with myself?  Hehehe.

When I posted a preview pic to Instagram last week, the lovely Courtney of Fork to Belly pointed out they looked like ginger leis.  I wholeheartedly agree!

Okay, on to the tutorial section.  To start, apply a crumb coat to the entire cake.  You do not need to make sure everything is perfectly frosted, but the crumb coat should be just slightly thicker than normal.  Unless you plan to create a petal design on the top of the cake (which would be really cool, too), ice the top of the cake before getting started.  You won't really get another opportunity to smooth or swirl the top, so be sure to take care of the top and edges now.

"Striping the bag" as I called it (not sure if I made that up or heard it elsewhere) can be a bit fussy, but not impossible.  First, fit a piping bag with a medium petal tip.  For stability, place the piping bag upright in a tall drinking glass then fold the bag open over the top edges.  Tint a small portion of your buttercream the color of your choice.  Using a thin metal spatula or butter knife, paint the tinted buttercream on the side of the bag where the narrow end of the petal tip is facing.  Did you get that?  The petal tip has a fat end and narrow end.  The narrow end will create the top of the ruffle.  That means, if that is where you want the color to go, then apply the tinted buttercream up the side of that part of the piping bag.  As you can see, this doesn't have to be perfect – but my ruffles did not turn out "perfect" either, so do as you wish =) 

Filling the remaining portion of the bag is much easier.  Simply fill a second piping bag with plain buttercream and squeeze it directly into the other bag.  I only kept my piping bag about 1/2-full at all times, allowing my to change colors as I refilled and to keep things from getting too messy.

How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.

To create the ruffles themselves, start about a half-inch or so down from the top of the cake.  Keep the narrow end of the petal tip pointing up (the coloured portion).  As you apply pressure, the buttercream being squeezed through the uneven opening of the tip will begin to curve and curl.  Moving with this natural curve, make a slight zig-zag motion with the piping bag (up and down the side of the cake) as you progress around the cake.  Slightly flare the narrow tip out (towards you), being sure the fat end of the tip is always touching the cake.  Continue around the cake until one row is complete.

To complete the cake, begin the second row under the first, allowing the top of the ruffle to overlap the bottom of the previous row.  Again, by slightly flaring out the tip towards you, the ruffles will begin to overlap.  As you progress and need to refill the piping bag, change up the colored portion as desired.  If your piping bag gets too messy, considering swapping it out for a clean one (I didn't end up having to do so until my very last row, but it was certainly necessary at that point for me).

How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.
How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.

So there you have it!  A Two-Toned Ruffle Cake!  

The perfectionist side of me wanted to go in and re-do every single ruffle that wasn't perfect, but the creative, carefree side said "leave it."  That side won.  Yes, I know each ruffle isn't perfect, but isn't that the beauty of it all?  It doesn't have to be perfect and I am still digging the flirty texture.  I sure hope that inspires you all to give it a try!

How to make a two-toned ruffle cake.

Now on to the awesome part of this post.  I've teamed up AHeirloom for a giveaway!!  That gorgeous, wood base cake stand that I know you've been swooning over this entire post?  Yeah, it's from them.  And you could win your own!

THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED.  CONGRATS, AMANDA! Enter your information below for a chance to win a $75 credit to AHeirloom (that's worth one of their stunning cake stands!).  US and Canadian residents only.  The contest will run until March 8th, so be sure to enter!  I'll be announcing the lucky winner next week.

A quick note about flowers on cakes:

As a previous wedding cake maker, I've had to seriously consider the effects of fresh flowers on cakes.  Not to sound overly dramatic, but if someone were to become ill after eating a cake, I bet they would blame the baker before ever thinking about the flowers that were on it.

That being said, I advise that you never put the stems of fresh flowers straight into the cake.  Instead, wrap the ends in floral tape and gently place them on.  If need be, anchor flowers onto a cake by inserting a drinking straw first, then placing the flower stems into the straw.  

I got the "Okay" from my florist when selecting the blossoms on this cake, but be cautious of the blooms you handle around food.  Typically flowers like roses are perfectly fine, but double check when dealing with other varieties.

PSA over.  Happy Baking!